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Speech 301 - Public Speaking

 

 

 

 

Professor Alisa Shubb

Office: D311

Phone: 484-8468

Office Hours: Fall 2003 MWF 11-12;  TT 12:15-1:15; by appointment

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Speech 301 will introduce you to the fundamentals of oral composition and delivery, focusing on methods for improving your skills as a communicator and public speaker. You will be involved in a variety of activities designed to enhance your understanding of speech preparation and delivery including lectures, reading assignments, in-class presentations, papers, exams, and critiques.

 

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

1. Deliver six (6) prepared speeches:

#1 Introductory Speech - 15 points

#2 Visual Aid Speech - 30 points

#3 Informative Speech - 75 points

#4 Sales Speech - 50 points

#5 Persuasive Speech - 100 points

#6 Celebratory Toast - 30 points

2. Take a midterm examination - 100 points

3. Complete 2 video-tape evaluations

Self analysis #1 - 25 points

Self analysis #2 - 25 points

  1. Attend Class; Submit critiques of classmates' speeches ; Participate in class activities including impromptu speeches - 50 points

GRADES:

500-450 = A

449-400 = B

399-350 = C

349-300 = D

299-000 =F

 

 

 

 

 

POLICIES:

ž Absence or lack of preparedness on a day in which you are assigned to speak will result in a ZERO for that speech.

ž There will be NO MAKE-UPS for any missed exam, speech, critique, or paper. Students with doctor verified illnesses or other grave circumstances should contact me before the due date of the assignment to discuss possible arrangements.

ž Incomplete or untyped outlines/preparation sheets will not be accepted and will result in a ZERO for that assignment.

ž Absences from class will seriously compromise your understanding of the course material and will dramatically affect your participation grade.

 

 

Course Calendar - Fall 2003

Monday Wednesday Friday
8/18

Introduction to Public Speaking

Purposes & Perspectives

Read:  Ch. 1

8/20

Communication & Listening

Read:  Ch. 2 & 3

8/22

Delivery

Interviews

8/25

Introductory Speeches

8/27

Introductory Speeches

8/29

Introductions & Conclusions

Read:  Ch. 9

9/1

HOLIDAY

 

9/3

Visual Aid Speaking

Speaking extemporaneously

Read: Ch. 4

9/5

Using Visual Aids

Read: Ch. 13

9/8

Thesis Statements

 

9/10

Ethos, Logos, Pathos

Read: Ch. 16

9/12

VISUAL AID SPEECHES

(Videotaped)

9/15

VISUAL AID SPEECHES

(Videotaped )

9/17

VISUAL AID SPEECHES

(Videotaped)

9/19

Speaking to Inform

Read:  Ch. 14

9/22

Sources & Materials

Read:  Ch.  6 & 7

9/24

Oral Citation of Sources w/practice

9/26

Organization

Read:  Ch. 8

9/29

Practicum: Focus on thesis

10/1

Outlining

Read:  Ch. 10

10/3

Demographics

Read:  Ch. 5

SELF ANALYSIS #1 DUE

10/6

INFORMATIVE SPEECHES

10/8

INFORMATIVE SPEECHES

10/10

INFORMATIVE SPEECHES

10/13

INFORMATIVE SPEECHES

10/15

INFORMATIVE SPEECHES

10/17

INFORMATIVE SPEECHES

10/20

Sales Speaking

10/22

Persuasion & Motivation

10/24

Audience Interest Levels

10/27

SALES SPEECHES

(Videotaped)

10/29

SALES SPEECHES

(Videotaped)

10/31

SALES SPEECHES

(Videotaped)

11/3

Persuasive Speaking/Motivated Sequence

Read: Ch. 15

11/5

Persuasion & Argumentation

Read:  Ch. 16

 

11/7

Ethics

11/10

HOLIDAY

 

11/12

Hostile/Neutral/Favorable

Audience adaptation

SELF ANALYSIS #2 DUE

11/14

 

Audience Survey

11/17

Outling the Motivated Sequence

11/19

Review in practicum

11/21

EXAM

11/24

PERSUASIVE SPEECHES

11/26

PERSUASIVE SPEECHES

11/28

HOLIDAY

 

12/1

PERSUASIVE SPEECHES

12/3

PERSUASIVE SPEECHES

12/5

PERSUASIVE SPEECHES

 

12/8

 Ceremonial Speaking

12/10

Comprehensive

 

Ceremonial Speeches will be delivered

in the time slot allotted as “final exam”

(see ARC class schedule for exact time)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading Criteria for Public Speaking Courses

 

"C" Speeches

 

"B" speeches

- fulfill all the requirements of "C" speeches and ALSO

 

"A" speeches

- fulfill all the requirements for "B" speeches and ALSO

 

"D" and "F" speeches

 

 

FAQs

Answered directly by your prof. Alisa Shubb

 

Is Speech 1 an easy class to get an "A" in?

Not really. While the material you are learning is not the most difficult to understand, the amount of work you have to do in this class is very high. Building speeches takes a great deal of time and effort, plus practice and determination. The exam is not tricky, but you must study and be prepared. Your writing skills must be up to par also in order to do well on the self evaluation papers. Finally, you MUST come to class. That said, "A"s are definitely achievable.

The thought of viewing myself on videotape appalls me. Do I have to do it?

A portion of your grade relies on the videotape evaluation papers. Videotape is one of the only ways for you to study your speech performance with some degree of objectivity. On videotape you can see what the audience saw. Viewing your videotapes and writing the evaluation papers is a process of self exploration. You may not be completely comfortable with this process but you will benefit from it.

What if I am not prepared on the day I have to give a speech?

You have a choice: speak anyhow without being prepared, or, lose your turn to speak and receive a zero for that speech.

How come X got a better grade than me when my speech was better?

The primary reason people think one speech is better than another is because the delivery was better. Delivery counts for about 20% of the total speech grade in this class. The rest of the grade is composition and how well the speech adheres to the assignment. (See grading criteria.)

What if I freak out while I am giving a speech?

Occasionally this happens. If you feel you need to stop and leave the room for some reason, you may. I once had a student who had to leave the room three times before she finally stood up and delivered a good speech. If you are very nervous, there are some anxiety reducing techniques you can use. Talk to me in or after class and I will be able to direct you to these resources.

OK, what if I don't completely freak out but mess up. Can I start over?

Yes. Especially if you are just beginning your speech. But you may find that the "messing up" is better handled by simply continuing your speech and not giving the mess up too much more thought.

My printer has been acting up, my hard drive crashed, my roommate has been ill... Can I turn in my outline late or untyped?

No.

_______________________

If you think you have a question that may qualify as frequently asked - please post it with you name in the guestbook. Questions may also of course be asked in person. See you in class.............

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Copyright Alisa M. Shubb, 1999